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Weekly Recap

Weekly Recap: November 25 – December 1

December 1, 2017

With the world of advertising and marketing moving so quickly, it can be hard to keep up with trends, ads, and more. Not to worry, we have you covered. This week, we recapped some of our favourite ads that happened throughout the week. Enjoy!

Written by Dakarai

Uber and MADD get together for emotional campaign

D: I think in today’s age it’s a reality that we’ve grown a bit desensitized to drunk driving commercials. We’ve all seen the messaging. They are intended to shock the audience into never even thinking of taking the wheels while under the influence. However, drunk driving is still a huge problem. MADD has launched “Motherhood”, a 60 second video that is actually aimed at those Canadians that are desensitized. The question is, what will it take for people to stop drinking and driving? Are these campaigns reaching them? Is the target their friends? There are a lot of questions to be asked but “Motherhood” is taking a step in the right direction with their PSA.

Spotify taps into their consumer data for a brilliant campaign

D: You might have remembered Spotify’s campaign last year, “Thank’s 2016” written by yours truly. Well this year they’re using the same approach in leveraging all of that hilarious consumer data and turning it into funny billboards. They’ve tapped into the amount of times embarrassing song has been streamed, or a weird playlist and more and have turned them into funny copy lines, such as “2018 Goals. Take a page from the 3,445 people who streamed the “Boozy Brunch” playlist on a Wednesday this year.”. It’s a fun play from the brand that also shows just how many active users they have. I mean all I know is if they referenced my playlist or a song I’m guilty of streaming a million times, they’ve just turned me into a lifetime member. Where do I sign up? See below for a few of my favourites.

 

That’s our weekly recap to keep you up to date on the best ads, trends, and more that we could find over the week. You can check out our last weekly recap here. Think we missed something important? Let us know! Also, be sure to follow us on FacebookInstagram, and Twitter.

Guest

So We’re Spying on You…. But is it Really All THAT Creepy? – Spotify’s ‘Thanks 2016, It’s Been Weird’ Campaign

October 6, 2017

Guest Article By: Michael Swanton

 

By now just about everyone under 90 is aware that the platforms and social media that they use are tracking as well as recording their data and selling it to devious marketers. That’s why that ad for a Cuban vacation won’t stop following you.

But is it really as creepy as it seems? One of my all time favourite campaigns was Spotify’s “Thanks 2016.. It’s been weird”. It totally breaks the stigma and provides a clear example of what marketing ought to be. The concept is simple yet genius, Spotify’s CMO Seth Farbman put it best when he commented on it saying “Utilizing data from listeners led to the idea of reflecting the culture via listener behaviour”.

So Spotify went global putting up massive billboards and trolling local audiences about their listening behaviour, some classics include: “Dear person who played “sorry” 42 times on Valentine’s day, What did you do?” Or better yet; “Dear person who made a playlist called “one night stand with Jeb Bush like he’s a bond girl in a European casino… We have so many questions.”

Spotify also managed to make witty yet insightful comments on popular culture during some of the of the most tumultuous and polarizing times this generation have seen. Comments like “Dear 3,749 people who streamed “It’s the end of the world as we know it” after the brexit vote, Hang in there.”

It’s almost as if the brand is engaging in a literal one on one conversation with you, and they’re pretty damn funny. They took the spirit of the moment and literally said what everyone was thinking… on a 42 foot billboard. This unique style gives the impression that Spotify knows us but stays within the bounds we are comfortable with, never mentioning any names, only commenting on funny and universally relevant insights. The way marketers typically use big data to follow you around the internet with pop up ads, or attempt to sneak in your social media feed has become transparent and tacky. But Spotify’s up front and in your face comments make way better use of this information, by relating to its users in an individual fashion and commenting on their quirks. It isn’t so creepy if they’re just trying to get to get to know you and crack a few jokes.

Spotify nailed this one, the fact that they “showed their hand” while playfully teasing their audience about their most private moments took serious marketing tact and poise. The copy was written in a tone that reminds you of funny twitter memes, or the way that a close friend might bust your chops. And this is what makes the campaign so genius, and a perfect example of proper marketing. Using listener data to mirror the culture to itself and communicating with the audience the way they communicate with themselves literally makes Spotify seem like they’re “part of the squad”, it makes the stigma around big data seem overblown and clarifies that that’s just how they know us. Not only that but it’s also how they can relate to us.

The campaign humanized Spotify as a brand, and got us to laugh at ourselves. It’s a risk to tease your audience, admit you know them a little too well or make political comments but that’s exactly what you would expect from a friend who knows you. And that’s why this is an exemplary example of marketing, they proved they know us implied that they accept us and made us feel as if they were one of us. What if the brands you use continue to try to become your “friend”, would you mind if Nike starts trolling on your Instagram photos if you rock Adidas?

 

Michael is a University of Toronto Digital Enterprise Management student, Freelance E-commerce solutions specialist, web designer and digital marketer. When he isn’t plotting on his next business moves or trying to sell you something, he’s at the gym at ungodly hours or making great memories with great friends. Check him out on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, and Snapchat @mswanton1

Weekly Recap

Weekly Recap (April 24th – April 30th)

April 29, 2016

Want to stay up-to-date with the new trends, products, campaigns, announcements and more throughout this past week? Say no more, we got you covered with our first ever weekly recap.

Written by Malick, and Dakarai.

 

Monday 

Drake opens up a VIEWS Pop Up Shop in Toronto

D: Over the last two weeks, Drake has been opening up Pop-Up shops around the U.S. in promotion for his fourth studio album, VIEWS. All it takes is a simple tweet from the Toronto rapper, turned Icon to bring 1000 people to a location within the hour. It was only fitting that the last location would be in Drake’s hometown, and he let out a tweet on Monday, April 25th at 5pm for the opening of the pop up shop at 6pm. Now, I definitely considered checking it out, but due to the fact that there was hundreds of people lined up within minutes, I wasn’t liking my chances. Check out the tweet below:

 

Tuesday

The Toronto Silent Film Festival Creates an Escape Room out of Instagram

D: You have to love when a brand exposes a medium in an innovative way. This is exactly what was done with the Toronto Silent Film Festival. The @tsff2016 Instagram account uses the platform to challenge people to solve a mystery using just the account. Every time you click a video, it will open as a first-video clip that appears as if you are searching for a clue. Users have to continually do so until they find the necessary clues to escape the room. Check out the short video below, it gives you all the details of the innovative campaign.

 

Wednesday 

National Geographic’s Face Swap Campaign

M: This is a good example of a good idea in which the message just completely got lost. This print campaign developed by Y&R Sao Paulo was titled “Swap Prejudice for Knowledge”, in which the premise was to encourage empathy, equality, and fighting intolerance. The campaign features several images of a diverse group of individuals who have their faces swapped with each other. While the idea was kind of interesting, snapchat can expect the same sort of backlash received by the “Bob Marley 420” snapchat filter.

national geographic

 

Thursday 

Reebok introduces a new short film

M: Reebok introduced a minute-long film titled 25,915 Days as a part of their Be More Human platform. The film introduces a woman as the main character and shows her progress…but in reverse. The film shows the woman’s participation in a Spartan Race down until her birth. One of the things that I really liked about it was that it was a great way to tell a story. Brands are constantly looking for new ways to market themselves, and storytelling ads add an entirely different dimension of emotion in advertisements. Reebok did a good job on this one.

 

Friday

Speed Rapper

M: This one was my favourite of the week. Developed by SuperHeroes New York, this sequence of videos are titled Low Battery vs Speed Rapper. The concept revolves around speed rapper Mac Lethal in a supermarkets picking out items for dinner. The catch is that his phone is about to die and he’s trying to figure out what to pick up from the person on the other line. He does this by speed rapping in order to finish he conversation before his phone dies. This seems like it would be a lot of fun to shoot, so props to SuperHeroes for this one.

 

These are some of the key moments we wanted to share with you so far from this week. Anything we missed? Let us know!

Make sure to check us out on Facebook for post updates.

Guest

Engaging The Consumer Through Storytelling

April 15, 2016

Guest Article By: Brian Jones

It has often been said that millennials are brand evangelists. When we fall in love with a brand, we’ll tell everyone. While millennials are wearing brands on their sleeves, Gen-Z (21-25) and Gen We (14-20) are a whole ‘nother ball game. New research has shown that they have more household peope waking shomi robotinfluence than their millennial predecessors and that they’re passionate about brands that help enhance their own personal brand (Zeno Group, 2016). Increasingly common, there have been IMCs that truly involve the consumer into the overall experience. It’s not just creating content anymore that consumers actively seek out, it’s content that consumers actually feel a part of.

A couple weeks ago, ad agency Rethink launched an innovative new campaign for Shomi’s TV series Mr. Robot. The show, if you haven’t heard of it, is based on a young computer programmer with a social anxiety disorder that becomes lost in a world hacking and confusion. Sidenote: It’s an amazing show to binge-watch if you happen to find a little free time during your exam week. Anyways, the campaign involved the integration of social media with their outdoor media placements. The outdoor ads were “hacked” midway through the campaign, providing region specific hashtags that drove interested consumers to special instagram accounts that provided further clues as to where $50 envelopes had been hidden around the city.

Found some cash in Graffiti Alley #weareall1sand0s #toronto

A post shared by Kyle Floro (@kylefloro_) on

 

Moreover, a recent campaign for Coffee-mate titled The Sudbury Incident involves a story about a mystery that has happened in a Sudbury and a faux-documentary filmmaker has been hired to get to the bottom of it. It has been unfolding over the past couple weeks and will continue to develop right into the fall. While this target audience is set a little higher at 20 to 35 years of age, it’s all about providing content that the consumer wants to pursue and get them to figure out what happened in Sudbury. A teaser for the campaign has been created to stand out from traditional commercials and entice users to look into the mystery of #TheSudburyIncident. Nestle Canada’s marketing leader, Ryan Saunders, said that “Hitting people over the head with benefit messages doesn’t always work”. MacLaren McCann Canada, the agency behind the work, have really quite outdone themselves.

 

On one such post, Instagram user @itsevananduncan has commented “a coffee commercial sent me here. I’d like to know why lol”. @thesudburyincident then replied “Hi Evan, I’m working on figuring it out.” It’s clear this quirky campaign is taking an unconventional approach at getting their product in front of new users. It’s working to pull in the consumer and get them to truly engage with the brand in a way never done before.

brand consumer module

 

Moving forward, I’d imagine we’ll start to see more of these campaigns that involve a strong aspect of both storytelling and consumer engagement. 2016 will be the year that content marketing evolves into something that will be completely integrated across all the mediums. Everything will have a purpose and a sense of connection. It’ll be a fun journey in which, more than ever, we’ll see brands actively engaging with consumers on a newfound scale. If you’re interested in this type of stuff, there’s a really good book called Storyscaping by Gaston Legorburu, Chief Creative Strategist at Publicis.Sapient and Darren (Daz) McColl, Global Chief Brand Strategy Officer at SapientNitro. Storyscaping involves this new marketing approach in which brands can go about creating experiences that blur the lines between the brand story and the consumer’s story. I’d highly recommend it.

 

 

Brian Jones is a tech-savvy marketing strategist currently in the Advertising: Account Management Post-Grad program at Humber Lakeshore. Having graduated from University of Guelph in Marketing Management Honours, he works part-time as a content marketer, blogger and web developer for small to medium-sized businesses in various industries. Connect with him on LinkedIn today.