Browsing Tag

influencer

Dakarai Turner

Why The #OneChipChallenge is the Perfect Branded Challenge

November 7, 2017

It seems as though every few months for the last couple of years, there has been a challenge of some sort that takes the internet by storm. Whether it’s the Mannequin Challenge that was started by a class of students, the Water Bottle Flip Challenge, The Running Man Challenge, The So Gone Challenge, or even the Cinnamon Challenge. We’re always on the edge of our seat to see which crazy challenge will pop up next.

 

Why do we like them? In my opinion they are just simply fun to do and they feel authentic. You’re able to join an online movement and participate in something with your friends, challenging others in the process to do the same. Now, one thing that is consistent in most of these challenges is that they aren’t branded. There isn’t a mastermind brand trying to drive sales of cinnamon powder by challenging consumers to eat a spoonful, or there aren’t water bottle companies that are encouraging you to do a bottle flip. The challenges are made by regular people and popularized once the bigger accounts begin to participate.

Now that’s how it used to be, until I came across the #OneChipChallenge. For those of you that are unaware, Paqui, a chip brand founded in Texas has issued the #OneChipChallenge in which they claim to have the world’s hottest chip. One box that features one Carolina Reaper chip. Consumers are encouraged to record and post a video of themselves eating the chip to be for a chance to win prizes ranging from a one year supply of their chips, to a neon sign of the Carolina Reaper.

To provide a bit more context, these chips are now completely sold out.  But not to fear, they are going for $40+ on Amazon if you’re feeling rich. Yes, a box containing a single chip. The challenge became even more well known after NBA legend and analyst Shaq ate one on ‘Inside the NBA’. This immediately made me wonder if other brands can work a challenge aspect into their campaigns. I’m not talking about the typical “submit your idea for our latest product, or answering a generic question on social media to be entered to win. Paqui was able to take the factor that differentiates them from other chip brands to their forefront.

However, for this to work for a brand, it will need to be authentic and make sense at the end of the day. Paqui was known for making hot chips, so creating a Carolina Reaper chip and issuing a challenge spoke to what the brand represents perfectly. Would this kind of challenge take off as well as it did if Lays was the brand behind it? You be the judge.

 

Dakarai is an ambitious professional with a passion for advertising and marketing, and is currently employed as an account coordinator for an ad agency in Toronto. When he’s not at the office, he’s most likely trying out a new restaurant, browsing AdWeek, or binge watching something on Netflix. Dakarai, but you can call him Dak. Follow him on TwitterInstagram, and connect with him on LinkedIn.

Dakarai Turner

From Memes to Sales: What We Can Learn From the RompHim

May 30, 2017

We’re in a time now where literally anything can go viral to put it simply. Whether it’s a Gorilla getting killed (R.I.P.), a Spongebob Squarepants image resurficing and becoming the latest meme, or simply a commercial so bad it gets people talking. The potential to go viral is always there and it’s incredibly unpredictable. Most recently, scrolling through my feed and reading about the “male romper”, titled “the RompHim had me thinking. This was a start-up company that launched on Kickstarter and was getting made fun of so much online that I thought to myself: “no way this is going to take off”.

And here’s the thing that had me puzzled. Despite all the jokes on social media, the RompHim has reached over $360k on Kickstarter with an original goal of $10k. Is the secret to a product launch to be “memed” to death? I mean it clearly works right? With over 3100 backers, there’s a clear market defined to explore and advertise…whether we want to admit it or not. Generally, or at least the way I remember it, when people make fun of a brand, they don’t typically go around purchasing products from said brand, but maybe that’s just the old way of thinking. Have the rules changed? Does this now mean that Pepsi’s sales will explode or that Fyre Festival will sell as many tickets next year as they did this year?

The fact of the matter is that any publicity is good publicity at this point. Whether your brand is getting pulled a part on social media, the takeaway is that at least people are talking about it. Can you force virality? Nope, and this is what makes it perfect. The narrative can’t be controlled or bought by a brand, since it belongs to the general public itself.

Needless to say I won’t be buying a RompHim any time soon. However, the roll out has done the company wonders. Not just on a financial scale but also in the social space. This makes you wonder if memes can translate into sales. All it really starts with is the trial of a product. The viral aspect will create the necessary reach, and the rest is on your brand.

 

 

Dakarai is an ambitious professional with a passion for advertising and marketing, and is currently employed as an account coordinator for an ad agency in Toronto. When he’s not at the office, he’s most likely trying out a new restaurant, browsing AdWeek, or binge watching something on Netflix. Dakarai, but you can call him Dak. Follow him on TwitterInstagram, and connect with him on LinkedIn.

Dakarai Turner

How to Get Rich Off Memes: A Look into Sponsored Content and @FuckJerry’s Empire

May 9, 2017

Memes – A form of communication, entertainment, and everything in between. Chances are one of your favourite past times are browsing through Instagram/Twitter and tagging friends in memes. Am I right? We’ve spoken about meme culture on this platform before, and it goes without saying that they are at the core of the millennial generation. With that being said, can they be monetized?

@FuckJerry, an Instagram account thats boasts 12 million followers has become nothing short of a franchise of its own. Expanding into clothing, a social agency, a card game, a video channel, and so much more, all sitting under the Jerry Media umbrella which has other accounts such as @pizza, and @kanyedoingthings. Now if you’re just as surprised as I am, you’ll be even more shocked to know that an account like @FuckJerry charges at least $30k for a sponsored post. To put this in context, the page offers 6 to 7 million impressions per post and this is not only attractive, but expensive for advertisers.

The above post was a piece of Burger King sponsored content that when I saw for the first time, the last thought on my mind was that it was paid material. This is the opportunity that brands have in partnering with meme pages such as @FuckJerry. Although the name isn’t the most PG, loosely based off of Jerry Seinfield, their sponsored content appears organic as long as it’s presented in an amusing fashion. Will they be partnering with a Shampoo brand for example? Probably not as their content is going to work better with an edgier brand such as Jack in the Box or Burger King. 2 of their dozen clients.

Brands are subjected to the style of comedy that these pages emulate as well as their fan base that browse the page daily and love to make comments. You’ll get an unfiltered and raw post that has the opportunity to reach over 6 million people and receive 30k comments in one day. Last year, the page earned over $2M in revenue and Jerry Media as a whole is expanding quickly. From launching @JerryNews to expanding on Snapchat and other platforms extending their reach.

So will we start to see more frequent sponsored posts appear on the meme pages we all know and love? Considering how you probably never noticed all of the paid material on the @FuckJerry page, it won’t even matter at this point. If the material “fits in”, then it will be consumed the same.

 

Dakarai is an ambitious professional with a passion for advertising and marketing, and is currently employed as an account coordinator for an ad agency in Toronto. When he’s not at the office, he’s most likely trying out a new restaurant, browsing AdWeek, or binge watching something on Netflix. Dakarai, but you can call him Dak. Follow him on TwitterInstagram, and connect with him on LinkedIn.