Browsing Tag

internet

Dakarai Turner

Net Neutrality and its Impact on Consumers, Marketers, and Brands.

December 19, 2017

At this point I’m sure you’ve seen the headlines, the memes, the hashtags and more about ‘Net Neutrality’. What is it? Does it affect me? How do we stop it? All questions that we ask ourselves upon hearing about this term for the first time. So let’s break it down. “Net Neutrality is the idea, principle, or requirement that Internet service providers should or must treat all Internet data as the same regardless of its kind, source, or destination”. Last week, the FCC (Federal Communications Commission) voted against the concept of Net Neutrality which can open the floodgates to a whole new Internet experience for Americans.

😂💯

A post shared by Daquan Gesese (@daquan) on

Now that we know the issues at hand, what’s next? This decision can ultimately affect brands and people in different ways, all dependent on which side you’re on. For example, content providers like Netflix could lose big if ISP’s (Internet Service Providers) such as Comcast and AT&T decide to limit bandwidth and slow down their platform in favour of streaming services in which they’re stakeholders. Your options would be to watch your Netflix shows at half the speed or pay for a specific data Internet package on top of your existing subscription. A move like this could also ultimately cause Netflix to raise their subscription amount out of necessity. The top companies can essentially create whichever data package that they choose, and it would be something that the market would simply have to deal with. Kind of scary isn’t it?

Managing a platform like The MAD Mix has caused me to always ask “What does this mean for advertisers/marketers? Well here’s the breakdown:

Viewability of digital ads, Pricing, User Experience.

If there’s a change in the loading speed for digital ads it will affect viewability standards as we know them. Want your ad to load quick on a web page? Time to pay more. Let’s not pretend that digital ads are all insanely effective as is, so could you imagine the drop in reach and engagement if they take more than a couple of seconds to load? The pressure for marketers to use media companies owned by ISP’s in order to run their ads on faster platforms would increase. With the same sort of idea in mind it can take a toll on the user experience for websites and platforms. Brands shell out a large amount of money to provide consumers with a smooth user experience from beginning to end, whether the goal is to entice a purchase online or build awareness. It’s relied on a mapped out consumer journey. A consumer journey that is at stake if speed and quality decreases.

In a digitally focused world, everything mentioned above is pretty much the worst case scenario for Americans. As a Canadian we’ll mainly be monitoring how this pans out for our neighbours, but at the same time not being naive enough to think it could never happen to us.

What are your thoughts on net neutrality? Let us know in the comments!

 

 

Dakarai is an ambitious professional with a passion for advertising and marketing, and is currently employed in account services for an ad agency in Toronto. When he’s not at the office, he’s most likely trying out a new restaurant, browsing AdWeek, or binge watching something on Netflix. Dakarai, but you can call him Dak. Follow him on TwitterInstagram, and connect with him on LinkedIn.

Dakarai Turner

How to Get Rich Off Memes: A Look into Sponsored Content and @FuckJerry’s Empire

May 9, 2017

Memes – A form of communication, entertainment, and everything in between. Chances are one of your favourite past times are browsing through Instagram/Twitter and tagging friends in memes. Am I right? We’ve spoken about meme culture on this platform before, and it goes without saying that they are at the core of the millennial generation. With that being said, can they be monetized?

@FuckJerry, an Instagram account thats boasts 12 million followers has become nothing short of a franchise of its own. Expanding into clothing, a social agency, a card game, a video channel, and so much more, all sitting under the Jerry Media umbrella which has other accounts such as @pizza, and @kanyedoingthings. Now if you’re just as surprised as I am, you’ll be even more shocked to know that an account like @FuckJerry charges at least $30k for a sponsored post. To put this in context, the page offers 6 to 7 million impressions per post and this is not only attractive, but expensive for advertisers.

The above post was a piece of Burger King sponsored content that when I saw for the first time, the last thought on my mind was that it was paid material. This is the opportunity that brands have in partnering with meme pages such as @FuckJerry. Although the name isn’t the most PG, loosely based off of Jerry Seinfield, their sponsored content appears organic as long as it’s presented in an amusing fashion. Will they be partnering with a Shampoo brand for example? Probably not as their content is going to work better with an edgier brand such as Jack in the Box or Burger King. 2 of their dozen clients.

Brands are subjected to the style of comedy that these pages emulate as well as their fan base that browse the page daily and love to make comments. You’ll get an unfiltered and raw post that has the opportunity to reach over 6 million people and receive 30k comments in one day. Last year, the page earned over $2M in revenue and Jerry Media as a whole is expanding quickly. From launching @JerryNews to expanding on Snapchat and other platforms extending their reach.

So will we start to see more frequent sponsored posts appear on the meme pages we all know and love? Considering how you probably never noticed all of the paid material on the @FuckJerry page, it won’t even matter at this point. If the material “fits in”, then it will be consumed the same.

 

Dakarai is an ambitious professional with a passion for advertising and marketing, and is currently employed as an account coordinator for an ad agency in Toronto. When he’s not at the office, he’s most likely trying out a new restaurant, browsing AdWeek, or binge watching something on Netflix. Dakarai, but you can call him Dak. Follow him on TwitterInstagram, and connect with him on LinkedIn.

Malick Ba

I Dream of Memes: Internet Culture and Influence

April 18, 2017

About a month ago, I was having a discussion with Dak about the Grammys. While none of us actually have cable, we both knew of several alternative ways to stream the event on the internet. When I had asked him if he’d tuned in to the “prestigious” (I use that term lightly…Re: Cee Lo Green) event, Dak simply said “I watched it through Instagram.” From that alone, I figured Instagram broadcasted it live, but no. What he meant was that he kept up with it through the influx of memes that had come out about it (again…Re: Cee Lo Green). That had me thinking a little bit. Is this how people keep up with events now? Live updates are nothing new, but memes have almost transcended actual text or broadcasted information.

Remember when people live tweeted events on Twitter? This is exactly what memes have become. This isn’t subject to the Grammys either. Think about it. If you’re like me and are extremely active on Instagram, you’d know that there are memes about literally every big event. NBA finals? There’s a meme for that. Grammys? There’s a meme for that. U.S election? There’s probably memes about that disaster every single day.  The point is that meme’s are apart of internet culture in ways that I never really thought of. While I still think doing research and not taking everything you see on the internet at face value is still extremely important, but memes are accessible to youth culture. Dare I say that this is one of the reasons why Twitter is becoming replaceable?

While I know people are still actively live tweeting, but just based on the number of meme accounts that exist on Instagram, there is always some sort of way to provide information in a comical way. It’s interesting to see the progression of meme culture. It works so quickly that within moments of any big event you can guarantee that someone online is in the process of making a meme about it. At the base root, it’s influencer content. If you own a popular meme account like fuckjerry or Daquan, you have the ability to post content through memes that may influence someone’s train of thought on any given subject matter. While it does seem a bit ridiculous to say that memes equal quality and truthful information through these influencers, the point still stands. People use memes to present information (comical or not).

That’s a lot of information to take in about internet content, but I really feel like memes are a prime example of alternative journalism. The culture around them for the most part is rooted in humour, but the fact that Dak was able to keep up with the Grammys without actually watching it on TV or tuning into a live stream was proof that they are important. Important in not only providing comical relief for events that may be serious, but providing information to a generation that’s not necessarily tuned into traditional media outlets.

Malick Ba is an advertising and marketing specialist currently living in Toronto, Canada. As an alumni of both the University of Ottawa and Humber College, Malick specializes in communications, advertising, and marketing. Currently, Malick works at an advertising agency in downtown Toronto and is looking forward to how he can further leave his mark upon the advertising and marketing world. Follow him on Instagram, and connect with him on LinkedIn.

Malick Ba

The 2016 Election vs The Internet

November 8, 2016

This is it. Today is the day we find out who will be the 45th President of the United States. I’ve been following this election for quite some time and have written a few pieces on it thus far-so what better time to wrap up the trilogy than the night of the election? At this point in the game, your mind is probably made up. Clinton? Or Trump? Rather than focusing on the candidates themselves, lets take deeper diver into how the coverage of this election on the internet has made waves. With the adaption of quicker technology, social media, and trends lets take a final look at how this has gotten a larger conversation going about the Presidential race.

 

#ElectionFinalThoughts

There’s no question that with the amount of posts, tweets, and memes (especially), social media has had an enormous impact on this election. While admittedly, Twitter isn’t my go to social media platform, I think its capabilities in reaching a mass audience have proven very effective in this election period. The hashtag #ElectionFinalThoughts trending on Twitter,eleciton-tweet users are able to give their final weigh in on both candidates, their goals, and more with less than 24 hours to go. Users across multiple social media platforms have engaged with this hashtag-some for comedic purposes, some not.

 

Memes:watchingthis

Attracting the young voter can be extremely difficult but I think that with the development of the internet and social media giants like Instagram has made it a lot easier for youth to engage in some kind of political messaging. If you’re on Instagram, memes have almost become a way of communication procmaxresdefault-2ess and are very effective in engaging users on any topic. With any huge event happening in pop culture, news, or sports, you can always expect a plethora of hilarious memes to follow. With an extensive amount of coverage online and offline about this election, memes have gotten social media users actually engaged with what’s going on in the U.S. While no, they aren’t novels or textbooks, but more importantly they allow some sort of shared commentary about the election among users on social media (most notably-young people).

 

Donald Trump’s Twitter Account:

Ohhhh boy. Now I don’t really want to focus too much on the candidates-rather the impact the internet has had over election coverage, but I could not leave this one off. Donald Trump’s twitter account (and public relations department) completely outside of politics is straight up just bad. Everything I’ve ever been taught about professionalism and presenting yourself accordingly goes against anything that Trump has ever tweeted. His tweets provide an almost comical commentary on really anything that might cross his mind. I think this election has really only solidified Trump’s irrationality and spontaneity online which in turn can be entertaining in the end.352f3d8800000578-3637755-image-m-30_1465752175782

There is no doubt that the internet and social media have developed exponentially since current President Barack Obama’s debut in 2008. There are good parts and bad parts to this. The bad being that it allows for misinterpretation of information. False information travels so quickly on the internet that simply doing a fact check could change your mind on any political candidate. The best part about the internet concerning this election is that it gives everyone a voice. The internet grants the average person to provide commentary and effective communication on this election through the use of blogging, memes, tweets, and more. For all of our American readers-you have a voice, let that be heard through an effective vote. Oh…and one more message before you hit the polls…

 

 

Malick Ba is an advertising and marketing specialist currently living in Toronto, Canada. His academic background includes a Bachelor’s of Arts in Communications with a minor in Sociology from the University of Ottawa. Currently, Malick works at an advertising agency in Toronto and is looking forward to how he can leave his mark upon the advertising and marketing world. Follow him on Instagram, and connect with him on LinkedIn.

Dakarai Turner

Blogs Out for Harambe: Why the Meme Can’t be Stopped

September 20, 2016

I think it’s gotten to that point where I have to talk about this. Harambe, yes the Gorilla that was shot and killed in the Cincinnati Zoo after a 3-year old fell in his enclosure has been all over the internet for months, if you haven’t already noticed. The question is…why? Well, there really is no logical way to explain it. Right after this situation happened in May, people were genuinely outraged at the fact that an animal had to be killed in the process. The story went on for a short amount of time and then ultimately faded away. But thanks to the wonderful people on Instagram and Twitter, the memes Harambebegan rolling through and they haven’t showed signs of stopping ever since. There have been songs made, merchandise sold, and even candlelight vigils held in cities around the world…for a Gorilla.

Trolls on the internet started the meme “Dicks out for Harambe” and it’s basically being said by just about every person under 25, which makes you wonder what it’s like to be a highschool teacher right about now. There are petitions to change the name of the Cincinati Zoo to the Harambe Zoo, and to change the name of the Cincinatti Bengals to “Harambes”. And to top it all off, in a recent poll, it was revealed that 5% of voters would vote for Harambe in this years election. Every day it seems as though there’s something even more extravagant with this Gorilla’s name attached, and it begs the question…when will it end? Like all good memes, they eventually die. However, it’s simply one of those situations that you cannot possibly predict, as to when. Who would have ever thought that this would gain the attention that it did, and that it would last this long in the first place?

View post on imgur.com

View post on imgur.com

View post on imgur.com

 

So what makes this meme so special?

It started as a movement fighting for the justice of a mistreated animal

When you read that it really doesn’t sound bad at all. People felt as though there were other ways to neutralize the Gorilla and child hostage situation, than to kill, and they expressed their passion and outrage online. There was even a petition with over 500k signatures to have the parents of the boy charged for their negligence. As usual, the internet brings out undercover experts in everything and anything.

It’s Brand-Proof

Quite often when “random” memes such as this one happens, there is usually a brand involved in some way that makes you wonder if it was all planned in the first place. An example being the “Damn Daniel” meme that was associated with Vans sneakers, or even the “Alex from Target” that was evidently associated with the large retailer. “Dicks out for Harambe” is a thing of its own that no brand would dare to touch. You find that as soon as brands get a hold of a meme they tend to die out. It’s kind of like when your mom first got Facebook and it drove you to spend more time on Snapchat or Instagram. The reason this meme has lasted so long in my opinion is because there isn’t a brand that can grab a hold of it. I mean, the Cincinnati Zoo could try and create Harambe inspired events/merchandise, but that would just come off as disingenuous since they were in fact the ones that ended his life in the first place, and have already expressed their discomfort of the memes

There’s no one behind itHarambe

Similar to my last point, this meme belongs 100% to the people. For example, “Damn Daniel” ends because Daniel’s friend, the one the meme belonged to stopped recording the funny videos. It reached it’s peak, and couldn’t be taken any further. You could try and carry it on all you want with your friend that’s also named Daniel, but it’s simply not going to be as funny and will probably come off as a little pathetic. Harambe was in the hands of the people from the start and will end whenever they get bored of it.

Personally I don’t find the memes to be all that funny anymore, but hey people still seem to be enjoying them, and they aren’t really doing any harm, so play on. What do you guys think of the viral success behind Harambe? Drop a comment, I’d love to know!

 

 

Dakarai is an ambitious professional with a passion for advertising and marketing, and is currently employed as an account coordinator for an ad agency in Toronto. When he’s not at the office, he’s most likely trying out a new restaurant, browsing AdWeek, or binge watching something on Netflix. Dakarai, but you can call him Dak. Follow him on TwitterInstagram, and connect with him on LinkedIn.

Weekly Recap

Weekly Recap (July 20 – August 5)

August 5, 2016

Want to stay up-to-date with the new trends, products, campaigns, announcements and more throughout this past week? Say no more, we got you covered with our weekly recap.

Written by Malick, and Dakarai.

 

Instagram Introduces “Instagram Stories”

D: Earlier this week, the social media giant Instagram revealed their newest feature, Instagram Stories. You know the whole idea of Snapchat stories right? Pictures/Videos that last only 24 hours, with the ability to put text over over them, and add filters. Yeah, that is basically Instagram Stories. Moments after announcing this new feature, the memes began to roll in, as expected. Either Instagram thought people wouldn’t make such a big deal out of it being the same as Snapchat, or they are playing for the long-run, hoping they can evolve their Stories feature in a better way. Regardless, I wanted to share with you some of my favourite memes that have surfaced these past couple of days.

 IKEA Releases “Let’s Relax”

IKEA’s latest campaign is intended to remind us of the simple things in life, sharing time with one another cooking, eating, and being together. The brand released a short video that pokes fun at the “Photo First” foodies out there. In 2016, practically everyone knows someone that can’t eat a meal without taking a picture of it and sharing it first. IKEA decided to show just how ridiculous that idea is, using an 18th century setting. This is the first video to start the campaign, as there will surely be more that follows. Although the video is shot well, and is rather funny, is there really anything wrong with taking a picture of your food before you eat? Check out the video below.

 
Suicide Squad Opens Up Shop in Toronto

D: With the blockbuster movie arriving in theatres today (August 5th), a pop up fan experience came to Toronto to get the public in the super villain mood. Warner Bros. Pictures brought the fictional prison from the movie to the Downtown streets of Toronto, where fans could walk through a recreation of the jail cell of one of the movies characters played by Will Smith, named Deadshoot. They are also able to view props from the movie, and smash vases and bottles in a recreation of Harley Quinn’s “Smash Cell”. Basically a dream come true for any Suicide Squad fan. Check out Malick’s article about the promotion behind the movie here.

The Revenge: Pokemon Go-Basel Tourismus

M: Tired of Pokemon yet? Sorry. This one is too good not to share. Basel Tourismus (a Swiss Travel Agency) put together a Pokemon Go inspired video that went completely viral. While we all know that Pokemon are meant to be captured, what happens when they try and catch you? This viral video shows a bunch of people dressed up in Pikachu outfits running around Basel throwing giant pokeballs at tourists.  Personally I think this is not only a funny video, but a great way to combine a popular trend with your business. The video has obtained around 49 million views in the last few days…talk about viral…

Vroom VR Showroom

M: Virtual reality is soooo cool. Vroom-an online used car dealership-has adapted VR technology to bring a new perspective of buying cars. What they’ve done is basically eliminated the difficulties of moving from lot to lot trying to find the perfect car for you. They’ve adapted VR technology in a way in which users can step into a virtual show room in which they can view different models and costs at an almost video game like simulation. I think this is just the beginning of the way consumers can interact with different products of services. It’s crazy to think that this is just the tip of the iceberg for VR technology. It will be interesting to see how Vroom continues to further this technology. Anyone else feel like playing Need for Speed Underground 2?

 

These are some of the key moments we wanted to share with you so far from this week. Anything we missed? Let us know! Check out last week’s special edition 2016 Olympic commercial recap , and be sure to like us on Facebook here.

Dakarai Turner

Caution: Reddit Ahead – Why Brands Should Tread Lightly In Using the Platform

June 28, 2016

Reddit, branded as “The Front Page of the Internet” has quickly grown to be quite the phenomenon. Since launching in 2005, 11 years later, you may have not heard of it, but Reddit has grown to 234 million active users and is usually the reason why something goes viral. If you’ve ever wondered where those immensely popular cat videos or dancing baby videos that you see on Facebook originated from, the answer is more than likely Reddit.

So what makes the platform so special and unique? In my opinion, is that it’s still organic. For the most part you can say exactly what you want to say, where you want to say it, without the embarrassment of having people your personal network view your activity. It is a community driven site in which “Redditors” can submit links to basically anything in a given “subreddit. Each post relies on “upvotes”, where each upvote is essentially one person saying that they like the material being posted, a downvote is the exact opposite. Just check out this screenshot of a few of the links on the front page of the platform. The higher the upvotes, the higher the visibility.

Screenshot of the front page

 

There’s everything from political discussions, to interesting pictures, to a “today I learned” section, which is pretty self explanatory. There are over 800,00 subreddits which are essentially communities or forums. In the subreddit dedicated to politics you’ll find just that, and in a more niche subreddit such as “hiphopheads” you’ll find discussions of new hip-hop music and topics of that nature. Now let’s go back to when I called Reddit organic. I say this because the platform is 100% free to use, and you are unable to pay your way to the top. In a world where you can pay for phony likes on Instagram and Facebook, Reddit upvotes are not for sale.

Now with that being said, how do brands effectively use this platform? First things first, Reddit can be a scary place for even a regular person, let alone a brand. Redditors aren’t scared to tell you exactly how they are feeling in the moment, and will let their opinions be heard. For the most part it’s anonymous, since your real name and picture aren’t plastered all over your account.

The key for brands to survive on Reddit is to be authentic. Understand the community that you are posting in, and follow the rules that each subreddit has established. I’ve always been a big fan for the way the NBA handles Reddit. With such a big organization there is bound to be a community that’s already been formed in your name, and the NBA does a great job interacting with this community. From posting their new ads, to providing original content, such as a Kobe Bryant mixtape, or Steph Curry’s pre-game routine. Content for the fans to enjoy.

 

NBA fans respond in a funny way

NBA fans respond in a funny way

 

The reason every brand isn’t currently putting their marketing efforts into the platform is because of a lack of understanding, and a great degree of fear. Even with myself (a 2 year Reddit user), I’m nervous to make a comment or post a link in fear of what the trolls will have to say to ruin my day. I’m sure with that being said you could understand why brands would be hesitant.

A recent example of the brutal honesty of some Reddit users is with the AMA (Ask Me Anything) community. Wyclef Jean used the platform to promote the 20th anniversary of The Scorea Fugees album. What started out as a discussion about his music quickly went south. Check out a few screenshots below that prompted Wyclef to end the AMA early, and effectively delete his account.

 

Reddit users fire at Wyclef Jean

 

 

Reddit is tricky to master, and although the physical number of audience members is there, brands need to truly assess whether or not this is the right platform to get their message across. What do you think of the platform, and the way brands/public figures use it? Drop a comment below, and be sure to like us on Facebook here for new updates!

 

Dakarai is an ambitious professional with a passion for advertising and marketing, who is currently completing an internship in account services for an ad agency in Toronto. When he’s not at the office, he’s most likely trying out a new restaurant, browsing AdWeek, or binge watching something on Netflix. Dakarai, but you can call him Dak. Follow him on TwitterInstagram, and connect on LinkedIn to learn more about him.

Guest

The New Facebook “Like” System: What does it offer to online consumers?

March 2, 2016

Over the last few years, it’s been safe to say that Twitter and Snapchat have not only climbed up the ‘social media ladder’ but have even jumped past Facebook in terms of consumer traffic and overall popularity. Why so? Those two social media platforms have differentiated themselves from the once-dominating Facebook platform, each having their own unique use of emojis, GIF keyboards (Twitter only), and personalized animations (Snapchat only), enabling online consumers to express their emotions and thoughts better than ever before on social media.

Finally, Facebook has discovered the competitive advantage created by Twitter and Snapchat in the social media market, and they came up with their own unique way to re-capture the attention and engagement of online consumers. Last Tuesday, Facebook officially launched their new “like” system. Now, you can not only “like” statuses and posts in the Facebook universe but you have the option to express your love, shock, anger, or sadness towards shared content on Facebook.

 

facebook likeA quick glance at Facebook’s new “like” system, which has been an immediate success since its launch on February 23, 2016. Before, you only had the option to “thumbs up” or “like” Facebook content.

 

 

This new “like” system enables Facebook consumers to be more (specifically) expressive about their opinions and thoughts on the ideas and content shared on Facebook timelines. It is a unique system that tells us two key goals in which the Facebook marketing team hopes to achieve in the near future:

  1. They want their brand loyalty back.
  2. They want to show the social media universe that they’re ready to keep up with the demands and trends of their fellow online consumers.

Well, from the first week since the launch of the new “like” system, it seems to be a huge success thus far for Facebook, as the majority of their users have picked up on the new platform tool with tons of “Wow”’s, “Angry”’s, and “Sad”’s being clicked on posts all across the Facebook universe. And how can it not be a success? Let’s be honest here, not every post on Facebook is a ‘happy’ one – some posts share devastating and/or controversial stories and trends going on around the world that people can now choose to click “Wow, ” “Angry,” and “Sad” on to express their ‘true’ reactions.

gif keyboard

A look at Twitter’s GIF Keyboard

snapchat animations

Snapchat’s personalized animations

 

 

This new feature (and, arguably, a benefit) that Facebook has to offer will surely make Twitter and Snapchat re-think their marketing plans and the developments of their upcoming “features” in the near future. Sure, with Twitter you now have a GIF keyboard to use memes to express your thoughts and emotions in the matter of a few clicks, and sure, with Snapchat’s personalized animations you can turn your face into basically the face of any fictional character ever created to express your current mood to your friends. However, Facebook’s new “like” system is a quicker and easier way to get your feelings and reactions out there.

That’s what makes a social media platform so successful (or not so successful): How fast and easy is it to communicate your message/voice your opinion? With the new “like” system, Facebook wins over Twitter and Snapchat in that regard – which is why it has become so popular so quickly. If this rapid increase in overall popularity and use of this new “like” system continues, Facebook will re-establish itself as ‘the’ social media platform for young, outgoing 20-year olds and re-gain that competitive advantage over Twitter and Snapchat in the social media market.

 

Anthony Pazzano is currently an Advertising and Marketing Communications student at Humber College. He is looking forward to expand his knowledge and experience in the Advertising/Marketing industry, and aspires to work client-side, agency-side, or for a PR firm. Follow him on TwitterInstagram, and Connect with him on LinkedIn.